Practice Blog

To share practice related stories, create connections and engage readers in the amazing diversity of dietitian experiences.


Aug
18
2016

Publishing a cookbook: Answers to your top questions

Published author Cara Rosenbloom dishes secrets that may help get your cookbook to market.


CR-HS1.jpgCara Rosenbloom, RD is the owner of Words to Eat By, a nutrition communications company based in Toronto. As a seasoned writer and nutrition educator, Cara is a regular contributor to the Washington Post, Today’s Parent, Food and Nutrition Magazine, and many other publications. She’s sought after as a keynote speaker and TV personality, and has appeared on Breakfast Television, Canada AM, CTV News, The Morning Show, and many other programs. Her first book, Nourish: Whole Food Recipes featuring Seeds, Nuts and Beans, launched in March 2016 and recently became a best-seller. Find Cara on Twitter @cararosenbloom, on her Facebook page WordstoEatBy, or on Instagram

My first cookbook, Nourish: Whole Food Recipes featuring Seeds, Nuts and Beans, was co-authored with Chef Nettie Cronish. The cookbook features 100 expertly crafted and tested recipes with tidbits of practical nutrition advice dispersed throughout.

To share some insights about book publishing, I co-presented the “Cookbooks 101” session at the Dietitians of Canada 2016 National Conference with literary agent Sally Ekus. We discussed how to properly write recipes and collect your work into a formal book proposal for publishers. 

Since the session, I’ve been pleasantly surprised to receive many questions from dietitians about the publishing process. continue reading
Aug
04
2016

Dietitians: Social justice trailblazers then and now

Think having roots in home economics is boring? Think again.  


JenB-HS1.jpegJennifer Brady is a dietitian and a PhD candidate in the School of Kinesiology and Health Studies at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario. Her dissertation explores the history of the dietetic profession in Canada, specifically the changes in dietetics’ knowledge base and the concomitant changes in the profession’s relationship with food and social justice concerns. Her other research areas include non-diet approaches to understanding health and dietetic practice, the sociology of food and eating, and gendered aspects of food work. Jennifer will start as a new faculty member at Mount Saint Vincent University in Halifax, Nova Scotia in the fall.

Although my internship prepared me well to practice as a dietitian, I left it with more questions than answers.  I wondered about the (primarily) women who built the profession from the ground up. How and why had they created this profession?  How does their work continue to shape what the dietetic profession is today? continue reading

 

Jul
28
2016

How to use stock photos to make your nutrition business stand out

Andrea Hardy discusses how to ensure you don't misuse other photographers’ images and shares her top five photo resources. 


Andrea-Hardy-HS1.jpgAndrea Hardy completed her dietetics degree at the University of Alberta and runs a private practice, called Ignite Nutrition Inc. She is a huge advocate for ensuring dietitians are seen as the go-to nutrition experts online. Andrea runs e-courses and a blog to help dietitians stand out on social media. Follow her on Twitter or Instagram @AndreaHardyRD, or  get in touch with her via email at andrea@ignitenutrition.ca

I started a blog as a way to get my voice heard through all the nutrition noise out there, as I am sure many other dietitians do. I wanted a way to stand up to all those self-proclaimed “nutrition gurus” prescribing 12 bananas a day as the holy grail to better health.

I assumed that people would rather hear quality nutrition advice, and naively believed growing a following would be easy. Well, as I’m sure all you bloggers out there know, that is not the case. continue reading
 
Jul
14
2016

Increasing access to dietitians: 5 myths about direct billing addressed

Susan Watson helps dietitians understand how to utilize medical insurance to increase access to dietitian services in private practice. 


SW-HS1.jpegSusan Watson is a tech savvy, trend seeking, social media addicted, entrepreneurial dietitian. She spoke about her experiences with direct billing at the 2016 DC National Conference in Winnipeg. Susan is the co-chair of the DC consulting dietitian’s network. Email Susan if you would like more information on direct billing for your practice at susan@alittlenutrition.com. You can also connect with Susan on Instagram and Twitter @LittleNutrition

Four years ago, I transformed the way I ran my business by deciding to offer direct billing services to my clients. At the time, I was primarily a stay-at-home mom seeing a few clients a couple nights a week, and had plenty of time to take on a bit of extra paperwork. I didn’t really know what I was doing, but had the time to learn, along with the admin staff at the clinics I worked out of to help me along the way.
 
I knew that there was a large demand for direct billing from my clients, but I had no idea that offering this service would actually triple my business. It got to the point where I had to hire a team of dietitians to meet the client demand. continue reading
Jul
07
2016

5 valuable reasons to pursue interprofessional education

A master’s student at the University of Toronto shares how interprofessional education can benefit your career, all while learning new skills!


LB-HS1.jpgLiana Bontempo has completed a Bachelor of Arts and Sciences in Biology and Studio Art, as well as a Bachelor of Science in Nutrition and Dietetics. She loves the ability of dietetics to bring together the arts, such as the socio-cultural aspects of food, with the hard sciences of health and nutrition. Recently, she graduated with a Master of Public Health in Community Nutrition from the University of Toronto and is excited to see what her career as a registered dietitian has in store! Connect with Liana on LinkedIn.

“Interprofessional” is a buzzword we all hear regularly, whether it’s at school, the workplace, or we're reading it on a job application. As health care professionals, we know that we have to work together, not only with our own dietetic colleagues, but also with professionals from other disciplines. 

At times, it can be hard to see why collaboration with other professions is important. How often have you uttered the phrase: "Ergh! It would be so much easier to work alone!"

Professionals from other disciples don't speak the same language as you, they often don’t understand your roles and responsibilities and, in the worst of cases, they can negate or impede the work that you have carefully put into place. By improving your interprofessional skills, you not only enhance your knowledge but you also avoid the anxieties and frustrations that can occur with team-based projects.

“Interprofessional” is more than just a buzzword, it’s a must for all health care professionals in order to provide the best care for clients, patients, and communities. continue reading 
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