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Feb 28 2014

Food Sources of Iodine


Information about Iodine


  • Iodine is mainly used to make thyroid hormones.
  • The thyroid helps to regulate the rate at which your body uses energy. It also plays a role in growth and development.
  • You only need very small amounts of iodine for good health. Without iodine your health can be affected over the long term.
  • Your body does not make iodine so it needs to come from the foods you eat. Most people can meet their mineral needs by eating a variety of healthy foods and following "Eating Well with Canada's Food Guide” at  www.healthcanada.gc.ca/foodguide.
  • The iodine content in foods can vary. The mineral content of foods depends on the mineral content of the soil where the food was grown or where the animals were raised.
 

How Much Iodine Should I Aim For?



Age in Years Aim for an intake of*
micrograms (mcg)/day
Stay below*
mcg/day
Men 19 and Older 150 1100
Women 19 and Older 150 1100
Pregnant Women 19 and Older 220 1100
Breastfeeding Women 19 and Older 290 1100
*This includes sources of iodine from food and supplements.

 

Iodine Content of Some Common Foods


  • The best natural occurring source of iodine is saltwater seafood. Freshwater seafood also contains iodine.
  • Iodine is added to all table salt in Canada. 1 teaspoon of table salt contains 380 mcg of iodine.
  • Kosher, pickling and sea salt are a source of natural iodine but do not contain as much as iodized table salt.
 
Food  Serving Size  Iodine (mcg)
Vegetables and Fruits
Lima beans, cooked 125 mL (1/2 cup) 8
Corn, cooked 125 mL (1/2 cup) 7
Green peas, cooked 125 mL (1/2 cup) 3-4
Grain Products
Cereal (check product label for serving size)
Crisped rice 30 g 20
Oat, o-shaped 30 g 14
Shredded wheat 30 g 8
Raisin bran 30 g 6
Other
Soda crackers 10 crackers 44
Bread (rye, whole wheat, white) 1 slice (35g) 17-32
Tortilla ½ tortilla (35g) 26
Pasta, egg noodles, enriched, cooked 125 mL (1/2 cup) 9
Rice, white, cooked 125 mL (1/2 cup) 4
Milk and Alternatives
Cottage cheese 250 mL (1 cup) 65
Milk (3.3% homo, 2%, skim, chocolate, buttermilk) 250 mL (1 cup) 52-62
Yogurt, plain 175 g (3/4 cup) 58
Yogurt, fruit 175 g (3/4 cup) 35
Hard cheese, cheddar 50 g (1 ½ oz) 22
Meat and Alternatives
Turkey, light, cooked 75 g (2 ½ oz) 30
Deli meat (salami, bologna) 75 g (2 ½ oz) ou 3 trances 16-21
Beef, various cuts, cooked 75 g (2 ½ oz) 11-14
Chicken, light or dark, cooked 75 g (2 ½ oz) 11-13
Pork, various cuts, cooked 75 g (2 ½ oz) 5-9
Lamb chop, cooked 75 g (2 ½ oz) 8
Organ Meats
Liver, beef, cooked 75 g (2 ½ oz) 32
Fish and Seafood
Cod, cooked 75 g (2 ½ oz) 87
Haddock, cooked 75 g (2 ½ oz) 87
Tuna, canned 75 g (2 ½ oz) 15
Meat Alternatives
Soynuts 60 mL (1/4 cup) 60
Beans (navy, black-eyed), cooked 175 mL (3/4 cup) 46-53
Egg, cooked 2 large 48-52
Beans (pinto, kidney), cooked 175 mL (3/4 cup) 19-28
 
Source: Institute of Medicine. Dietary Reference Intakes. Washington: The National Academies Press;2006 and Pennington, J. and Douglass, J. Bowes and Church's Food Values of Portions Commonly Used, 18 E. Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, 2005.

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