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Feb 25 2014

Food Sources of Vitamin D

Information about Vitamin D

 
  • Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin. This means that your body can store extra amounts of vitamin D.
  • It is important to get enough vitamin D from your diet because it helps our bodies absorb and use calcium and phosphorous for strong bones and teeth. Vitamin D can help protect older adults against osteoporosis.
  • Vitamin D can also protect against infections by keeping your immune system healthy.
  • It may help reduce the risk of developing chronic diseases such as multiple sclerosis and certain types of cancer, such as colorectal cancer but this is still being studied.
 
 

How Vitamin D Should I Aim For?

 
Age in Years Aim for an intake of internaitional units (IU/day)* Stay below*
IU/day
Men and Women 19-50 600 4000
Men and Women 51-70 600 4000
Men and Women 71 and older 800 4000
Pregnant and Breastfeeding Women 19 and older 600 4000
 
     * This includes sources of vitamin D from food and supplements.
 
Health Canada advises adults over the age of 50 to take a vitamin D supplement of 400 IU each day.
 
 
 

Vitamin D Content of Some Common Foods

 
Vitamin D is not found naturally in many commonly consumed foods. In Canada, some foods such as milk, soy or rice beverages and margarine have vitamin D added to them. Good food sources of vitamin D include certain kinds of fish, egg yolks and milk. The following table will show you foods that are a source of vitamin D.

Food Serving Size Vitamin D (IU)
Vegetables and Fruit This food group contains very little of this nutrient
Orange juice, fortified with vitamin D 125 mL (½ cup) 50
Grain Products This food group contains very little of this nutrient.
Milk and Alternatives    
Soy beverage, fortified with vitamin D 250 mL (1 cup) 123
Milk (3.3 % homo, 2%, 1%, skim, chocolate milk) 250 mL (1 cup) 103-105
Skim milk powdered 24 g (will make 250 mL of milk) 103
Soy beverage, fortified with vitamin D 250 mL (1 cup) 88
Yogurt (plain, fruit bottom), fortified with vitamin D 175 g (3/4 cup) 58-71
Meat and Alternatives    
Egg, yolk, cooked 2 large 57-88
Pork, various cuts, cooked 75 g (2 ½ oz) 6-60
Deli meat (pork, beef, salami, bologna) 75 g (2 ½ oz)/ 3 slices 30-54
Beef live, cooked 75 g (2 ½ oz) 36
Fish and Seafood    
Salmon, sockeye/red, canned, cooked or raw 75 g (2 ½ oz) 530-699
Salmon, humpback/pink, canned, cooked or raw 75 g (2 ½ oz) 351-497
Salmon, coho, raw or cooked 75 g (2 ½ oz) 326-421
Snapper, cooked 75 g (2 ½ oz) 392
Salmon, chinook, raw or cooked 75 g (2 ½ oz) 319-387
Whitefish, lake, cooked 75 g (2 ½ oz) 369
Mackerel, Pacific, cooked 75 g (2 ½ oz) 342
Salmon, Atlantic, raw or cooked 75 g (2 ½ oz) 181-246
Salmon, chum/keta, raw or cooked 75 g (2 ½ oz) 203-221
Mackerel, canned 75 g (2 ½ oz) 219
Herring, Atlantic, pickled 75 g (2 ½ oz) 210
Trout, cooked 75 g (2 ½ oz) 150-210
Herring, Atlantic, cooked 75 g (2 ½ oz) 161
Roe, raw 30 g (1 oz) 145
Sardines, Pacific, canned 75 g (2 ½ oz) 144
Halibut, cooked 75 g (2 ½ oz) 144
Tuna, albacore, raw or cooked 75 g (2 ½ oz) 82-105
Mackerel, Atlantic, cooked 75 g (2 ½ oz) 78
Tuna, white, canned with water 75 g (2 ½ oz) 60
Fats and Oils    
Cod liver oil 5 mL (1 tsp) 427
Margarine 5 mL (1 tsp) 25
Other    
Goat’s milk, fortified with Vitamin D 250 mL (1 cup) 100
Rice, oat, almond beverage, fortified with Vitamin D 250 mL (1 cup) 88-90
Source: "Canadian Nutrient File 2010"
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/nutrition/fiche-nutri-data/index-eng.php
[Accessed March 30, 2012].

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