Practice Blog

To share practice related stories, create connections and engage readers in the amazing diversity of dietitian experiences.


Call to Action: Dietitians need to help guide effective nutritional supplementation

Two dietitians discuss why they think RDs should play a stronger role in the booming supplement industry and meet consumer demands for reliable information. 

LK-HS1.jpgLaura Kalina, RD, MAdEd is a registered dietitian, author, professional speaker, and award-winner for excellence in health promotion, nutrition communication, and food security. She specializes in low-glycemic eating and weight management, nutritional supplementation, and is a co-author of the national best seller, “Low Glycemic Meals in Minutes.” She has a passion for sharing the importance of healthy eating and cellular nutrition to prevent chronic disease. You can contact Laura by email at or visit her website

Arrey, RD has a thriving dietetics practice based in Montreal where she has been able to help her clients achieve their health goals, lose weight, and find lasting relief from pain, while encouraging them to choose delicious healthy food. She is the author of “The Complete Arthritis Health, Diet Guide and Cookbook,” with Dr. Michael Starr. Kim speaks and lectures on healthy eating choice and transforming complex scientific information into easy to understand terms. She is often asked to comment on nutrition issues by local and national journalists. Contact Kim at or visit her website

Consumers are looking for reliable information on supplements. In the quest for better health, sport performance gains, or simply relief when living with chronic or terminal conditions, consumers are willing to invest in supplements – in addition to adopting a healthy diet. In the past, most dietitians have been hesitant to promote supplements – instead, emphasizing investment in good foods and healthy eating patterns. There is now a growing body of dietitians who have honed their expertise in this area and are calling on others to do the same. continue reading 

A unique partnership brought healthy food to downtown Toronto

A master’s student discusses how a mobile fruit and vegetable market changed the food environment outside of Toronto General Hospital.  

AH-HS1.jpgAnneke Hobson is a Master of Public Health student in Nutrition and Dietetics at the University of Toronto. Her many interests include food systems, food policy and economics, food and ecosystems, and the future of food. In her previous life, Anneke studied literature at the University of Calgary, and still enjoys a great novel or poem. In July 2016, Anneke volunteered to help out at a collaborative mobile market outside Toronto General Hospital, an experience that sparked ideas about the food environment. Get in touch with Anneke via email at

In July 2016, I spent a sweaty noon-hour outside Toronto General Hospital convincing passers-by to purchase guavas and other produce from a repurposed wheel-trans bus. Why? Earlier this summer, I got excited about a new collaboration between three institutional giants in Toronto: The University Health Network (UHN), Toronto Public Health (TPH), and FoodShare. These organizations represent dietetic care across the health continuum, from health promotion to tertiary care. This partnership therefore brings to life a form of clinical public health. I decided to get involved. continue reading

5 considerations for working with populations with mental illness

Rachel, a dietitian in the Hamilton/Toronto area with a passion for working in mental health, shares insights from her recent practicum experiences. 


RHHS1.jpgRachel Hicks recently completed her Master of Public Health in Nutrition and Dietetics (formerly Community Nutrition) at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto. She is interested in many areas of nutrition on a local and global scale and has developed a passion for working with vulnerable populations in diverse communities. Connect with Rachel on LinkedIn.  

Nutrition and its association with mental health and mental illness is becoming more and more recognized. Compared to the general population, individuals with complex mental illness (CMI) are at a greater risk of developing disease comorbidities (abnormal triglycerides, hypertension, glucose dysregulation, and abdominal obesity) and subsequent chronic disease (cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes). This is significant, especially considering 1 in 5 Canadians experience some sort of mental health issue. continue reading


5 valuable reasons to pursue interprofessional education

A master’s student at the University of Toronto shares how interprofessional education can benefit your career, all while learning new skills!

LB-HS1.jpgLiana Bontempo has completed a Bachelor of Arts and Sciences in Biology and Studio Art, as well as a Bachelor of Science in Nutrition and Dietetics. She loves the ability of dietetics to bring together the arts, such as the socio-cultural aspects of food, with the hard sciences of health and nutrition. Recently, she graduated with a Master of Public Health in Community Nutrition from the University of Toronto and is excited to see what her career as a registered dietitian has in store! Connect with Liana on LinkedIn.

“Interprofessional” is a buzzword we all hear regularly, whether it’s at school, the workplace, or we're reading it on a job application. As health care professionals, we know that we have to work together, not only with our own dietetic colleagues, but also with professionals from other disciplines. 

At times, it can be hard to see why collaboration with other professions is important. How often have you uttered the phrase: "Ergh! It would be so much easier to work alone!"

Professionals from other disciples don't speak the same language as you, they often don’t understand your roles and responsibilities and, in the worst of cases, they can negate or impede the work that you have carefully put into place. By improving your interprofessional skills, you not only enhance your knowledge but you also avoid the anxieties and frustrations that can occur with team-based projects.

“Interprofessional” is more than just a buzzword, it’s a must for all health care professionals in order to provide the best care for clients, patients, and communities. continue reading 

London adventures: Working as an unlicensed dietitian abroad

A Vancouver-based dietitian shares her adventures and unique job opportunities while seeking employment in the United Kingdom.

Laura-Ledas-HS1.pngLaura Ledas graduated from the UBC dietetics program in June 2014 after completing a 10-month internship in Northern British Columbia.  One week later, she moved to London, England and experienced what it was like to work as a dietitian abroad. She has since returned to Canada and is working as a dietitian at a long term care centre in West Vancouver, has a private practice at Expert Physio, and is a master trainer with Food Skills for Families, run by the Canadian Diabetes Association. Find Laura on LinkedIn or Twitter @lauraledas.

You may quiver knowing that I decided to move to the fish and chips capital of the world to further my career in the food and nutrition field. I was warned that I’d have my work cut out for me with much of the population consuming potatoes and mushy peas as their main sources of vegetables.
London is known for their unwavering devotion to the royals, an iconic nursery rhyme bridge, love for the handsome David Beckham and, of course, hearty pub food paired with bottomless pints of beer.
For those of you who have visited this vibrant city and for those of you who may travel there in the future, I want to open your eyes to the lesser known green smoothie drinking and organic food eating experience that I stumbled upon while living in West Kensington for 14 months. continue reading
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