Practice Blog

To share practice related stories, create connections and engage readers in the amazing diversity of dietitian experiences.


Jan
12
2017

Call to Action: Dietitians need to help guide effective nutritional supplementation

Two dietitians discuss why they think RDs should play a stronger role in the booming supplement industry and meet consumer demands for reliable information. 


LK-HS1.jpgLaura Kalina, RD, MAdEd is a registered dietitian, author, professional speaker, and award-winner for excellence in health promotion, nutrition communication, and food security. She specializes in low-glycemic eating and weight management, nutritional supplementation, and is a co-author of the national best seller, “Low Glycemic Meals in Minutes.” She has a passion for sharing the importance of healthy eating and cellular nutrition to prevent chronic disease. You can contact Laura by email at laurakalina@telus.net or visit her website lowgimeals.com.


KA-HS1.jpgKim 
Arrey, RD has a thriving dietetics practice based in Montreal where she has been able to help her clients achieve their health goals, lose weight, and find lasting relief from pain, while encouraging them to choose delicious healthy food. She is the author of “The Complete Arthritis Health, Diet Guide and Cookbook,” with Dr. Michael Starr. Kim speaks and lectures on healthy eating choice and transforming complex scientific information into easy to understand terms. She is often asked to comment on nutrition issues by local and national journalists. Contact Kim at kimarrey@gmail.com or visit her website kimarreynutrition.com.

Consumers are looking for reliable information on supplements. In the quest for better health, sport performance gains, or simply relief when living with chronic or terminal conditions, consumers are willing to invest in supplements – in addition to adopting a healthy diet. In the past, most dietitians have been hesitant to promote supplements – instead, emphasizing investment in good foods and healthy eating patterns. There is now a growing body of dietitians who have honed their expertise in this area and are calling on others to do the same. continue reading 
 
Jul
07
2016

5 valuable reasons to pursue interprofessional education

A master’s student at the University of Toronto shares how interprofessional education can benefit your career, all while learning new skills!


LB-HS1.jpgLiana Bontempo has completed a Bachelor of Arts and Sciences in Biology and Studio Art, as well as a Bachelor of Science in Nutrition and Dietetics. She loves the ability of dietetics to bring together the arts, such as the socio-cultural aspects of food, with the hard sciences of health and nutrition. Recently, she graduated with a Master of Public Health in Community Nutrition from the University of Toronto and is excited to see what her career as a registered dietitian has in store! Connect with Liana on LinkedIn.

“Interprofessional” is a buzzword we all hear regularly, whether it’s at school, the workplace, or we're reading it on a job application. As health care professionals, we know that we have to work together, not only with our own dietetic colleagues, but also with professionals from other disciplines. 

At times, it can be hard to see why collaboration with other professions is important. How often have you uttered the phrase: "Ergh! It would be so much easier to work alone!"

Professionals from other disciples don't speak the same language as you, they often don’t understand your roles and responsibilities and, in the worst of cases, they can negate or impede the work that you have carefully put into place. By improving your interprofessional skills, you not only enhance your knowledge but you also avoid the anxieties and frustrations that can occur with team-based projects.

“Interprofessional” is more than just a buzzword, it’s a must for all health care professionals in order to provide the best care for clients, patients, and communities. continue reading 
Jun
02
2016

London adventures: Working as an unlicensed dietitian abroad

A Vancouver-based dietitian shares her adventures and unique job opportunities while seeking employment in the United Kingdom.


Laura-Ledas-HS1.pngLaura Ledas graduated from the UBC dietetics program in June 2014 after completing a 10-month internship in Northern British Columbia.  One week later, she moved to London, England and experienced what it was like to work as a dietitian abroad. She has since returned to Canada and is working as a dietitian at a long term care centre in West Vancouver, has a private practice at Expert Physio, and is a master trainer with Food Skills for Families, run by the Canadian Diabetes Association. Find Laura on LinkedIn or Twitter @lauraledas.

You may quiver knowing that I decided to move to the fish and chips capital of the world to further my career in the food and nutrition field. I was warned that I’d have my work cut out for me with much of the population consuming potatoes and mushy peas as their main sources of vegetables.
 
London is known for their unwavering devotion to the royals, an iconic nursery rhyme bridge, love for the handsome David Beckham and, of course, hearty pub food paired with bottomless pints of beer.
 
For those of you who have visited this vibrant city and for those of you who may travel there in the future, I want to open your eyes to the lesser known green smoothie drinking and organic food eating experience that I stumbled upon while living in West Kensington for 14 months. continue reading
May
26
2016

Fasting during Ramadan: What dietitians need to know & how to help your clients

Mohamed, a dietitian from Egypt, shares tips for working with clients that participate in Ramadan and provides an example meal plan.  


MRHS1.jpgMohamed Rezk completed a B.Sc. in Biomedical Sciences from the University of Waterloo before completing his dietetics degree at Mount St. Vincent University. He currently works in his private practice, Re-Direct Nutrition Counselling, in Toronto. Mohamed grew up in Egypt and moved to Canada at the age of 20. This experience helped him realize the importance of learning about other cultures to help make his counselling more effective. You can reach Mohamed at mohamed@redirectnutrition.com. He also blogs on his website: www.redirectnutrition.com.


Ramadan is the one month per year where Muslims fast from dawn until sunset every day by refraining from food, water, smoking, medications, and even gum. Pregnant and breastfeeding women, children, seniors, and those on important medications or requiring nutrition care (such as people with diabetes, renal failure, or patients on tube feeds) are exempt from fasting.

During this month, Muslims spend more time getting closer to God, refrain from bad habits, and focus on spiritual growth. This year, Ramadan starts on June 7th. In Canada, Muslims will be fasting 16-17 hours per day, which allows for only 7-8 hours to nourish their bodies and sleep. While Muslim countries cut down their workdays by half during Ramadan, this is not the case in Canada. The combination of high expectations at work or school, long fasting hours, and poor nutrition could be a disaster for Muslims’ health. continue reading
Apr
07
2016

Living with diabetes: Walking a mile in my patients' shoes

Laura Baum shares her unique experience “living” with type 2 diabetes for a week. 


LB-HS1.jpgLaura Baum completed her undergraduate degree at Brescia College, at the University of Western Ontario.  She is currently completing the final months of her Master of Science in Foods and Nutrition, also at Brescia College.  Laura’s interests include running and all things active, cooking for friends and family, and traveling.  Special areas of interest in dietetics include paediatrics, diabetes education, and bariatric surgery; however she is open to all opportunities!  To contact Laura, email her at lbaum@uwo.ca, or connect with her via LinkedIn.

Health is a privilege.  Health is luck.  Health is genetic.  Health is life.  After completing my diabetes rotation at Sunnybrook Hospital in the outpatient diabetes education centre, I have realized how lucky and thankful I am to be healthy.  It is truly a miracle how all the systems in one’s body work cohesively to sustain a healthy body.
 
In the final week of my placement, I participated in a program called, “Living with Diabetes.”  Essentially, I was supposed to live for a week mimicking the life of someone with type 2 diabetes.  Participants in this program included four family practice residents, a family practice physician and myself.  We met every morning and were presented with the progression of our diabetes, which would likely have taken years, but for this simulation, it only took a few days. continue reading
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