Practice Blog

To share practice related stories, create connections and engage readers in the amazing diversity of dietitian experiences.


Dec
08
2016

A unique partnership brought healthy food to downtown Toronto

A master’s student discusses how a mobile fruit and vegetable market changed the food environment outside of Toronto General Hospital.  


AH-HS1.jpgAnneke Hobson is a Master of Public Health student in Nutrition and Dietetics at the University of Toronto. Her many interests include food systems, food policy and economics, food and ecosystems, and the future of food. In her previous life, Anneke studied literature at the University of Calgary, and still enjoys a great novel or poem. In July 2016, Anneke volunteered to help out at a collaborative mobile market outside Toronto General Hospital, an experience that sparked ideas about the food environment. Get in touch with Anneke via email at anneke.hobson@mail.utoronto.ca

In July 2016, I spent a sweaty noon-hour outside Toronto General Hospital convincing passers-by to purchase guavas and other produce from a repurposed wheel-trans bus. Why? Earlier this summer, I got excited about a new collaboration between three institutional giants in Toronto: The University Health Network (UHN), Toronto Public Health (TPH), and FoodShare. These organizations represent dietetic care across the health continuum, from health promotion to tertiary care. This partnership therefore brings to life a form of clinical public health. I decided to get involved. continue reading
 
Feb
25
2016

Launching a revolutionary new program in culinary medicine [debrief and future plans]

From inspiration to execution – reflecting on the joys and challenges involved with creating a culinary medicine program from scratch, getting it accredited, and being pioneers chartering new territory. 


AL-HS1.jpgAngel Luk, BSc, RD is a registered dietitian with the College of Dietitians of BC and a member of Dietitians of Canada and SportMedBC. Since joining the Richmond Olympic Oval in 2014, Angel has worked with athletes at the community, provincial, and national level. While Angel specializes in sport nutrition, she has simultaneously pursued her passion for preventative health by co-creating a hands-on course: The Physician in the Kitchen. The goal of the course is to assist physicians and allied health professionals to provide earlier and evidence based nutrition interventions. Connect with Angel on Twitter @FoodMysteries or LinkedIn.

Allow me to start by extending my heartfelt gratitude for the overwhelming support the dietitian community extended after my first Practice Blog post. I feel so incredibly proud to be part of a profession that prides itself in collaboration and innovation. Your encouraging messages and support in spreading the word about The Physician in the Kitchen program has no doubt contributed to its success.
 
The inspiration for Physician in the Kitchen
 
These two quotes recap the motivation for developing this program well ... continue reading
Oct
22
2015

Why I worked with a chef & doctor to create a revolutionary new program in culinary medicine

A creative dietitian, with a lot of passion and a ton of hard work, helps create a culinary medicine course in a matter of months!

 

AL-HS1.jpgAngel Luk, BSc, RD is a registered dietitian with the College of Dietitians of BC and a member of Dietitians of Canada and SportMedBC. She has been working as a clinical dietitian within Vancouver Coastal Health since 2012 in a variety of settings. Since joining the Richmond Olympic Oval in 2014, Angel has worked with athletes at the community, provincial, and national level. While Angel specializes in sport nutrition, she has simultaneously pursued her passion for preventative health by co-creating a hands-on course: The Physician in the Kitchen. The goal of the course is to assist physicians and allied health professionals to provide earlier and evidence based nutrition interventions. Connect with Angel on Twitter @FoodMysteries or LinkedIn.

I know I am “preaching to the choir” here, but for the sake of argument, let me ask this question, “What if nutrition interventions were put into action earlier and more proactively?” If we agree that preventative health is crucial, how do we achieve this to a greater degree and increase our reach? Moreover, why isn’t more being done to prevent the growing number of hospital admissions for conditions with a significant nutritional component in the first place? continue reading
 

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