Practice Blog

To share practice related stories, create connections and engage readers in the amazing diversity of dietitian experiences.


Sep
17
2019

Why I worked with a chef & doctor to create a revolutionary new program in culinary medicine

A creative dietitian, with a lot of passion and a ton of hard work, helps create a culinary medicine course in a matter of months!

 

AL-HS1.jpgAngel Luk, BSc, RD is a registered dietitian with the College of Dietitians of BC and a member of Dietitians of Canada and SportMedBC. She has been working as a clinical dietitian within Vancouver Coastal Health since 2012 in a variety of settings. Since joining the Richmond Olympic Oval in 2014, Angel has worked with athletes at the community, provincial, and national level. While Angel specializes in sport nutrition, she has simultaneously pursued her passion for preventative health by co-creating a hands-on course: The Physician in the Kitchen. The goal of the course is to assist physicians and allied health professionals to provide earlier and evidence based nutrition interventions. Connect with Angel on Twitter @FoodMysteries or LinkedIn.

I know I am “preaching to the choir” here, but for the sake of argument, let me ask this question, “What if nutrition interventions were put into action earlier and more proactively?” If we agree that preventative health is crucial, how do we achieve this to a greater degree and increase our reach? Moreover, why isn’t more being done to prevent the growing number of hospital admissions for conditions with a significant nutritional component in the first place? continue reading
 

Aug
03
2018

How I Got My First-Choice Dietetic Internship: A Sneak Peek into My Application

Evita Basillio Evita is a Registered Dietitian working in health technology. She completed her BSc. in Nutrition and Dietetics at Acadia University, Master’s diploma at Ryerson University, and Dietetic Internship at St. Michael’s Hospital. Evita has a love for health, science and writing. Connect with Evita on LinkedIn, Instagram or email.

Applying to dietetic internships was hands-down the most stressful experience in my life. It’s been almost a year since graduating from my internship program at St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto, and I’m hoping to help any future dietitians on your path to scoring the internship of your dreams. continue reading

Apr
20
2018

My Reflection about McGill’s Master’s of Science Applied in Human Nutrition- Dietetics Credentialing

Janelle HatchAlaa received her BASc. in Nutrition & Food from Ryerson University in 2015. She went on to receive her master’s degree in Human Nutrition from McGill University in December 2017. As a newly licensed dietitian, Alaa is eager to share her experience as a graduate and dietetic student. In addition to her love of food and nutrition, Alaa enjoys fitness, travelling, and catching up on her latest TV series. Connect with Alaa on LinkedIn.

It was around two and a half years ago, when the exhilaration stemming from my undergraduate commencement began to fade, that the questions that plague most graduates surfaced. What’s next? Did I want to pursue a master’s degree? Did I want to go straight into an internship? Personally, I still had a lot of growing to do and did not feel ready to jump right into an internship. And more importantly, I knew that I wanted to learn more and delve deeper into the field of human nutrition. I guess that answers my question, right?   continue reading

Aug
04
2016

Dietitians: Social justice trailblazers then and now

Think having roots in home economics is boring? Think again.  


JenB-HS1.jpegJennifer Brady is a dietitian and a PhD candidate in the School of Kinesiology and Health Studies at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario. Her dissertation explores the history of the dietetic profession in Canada, specifically the changes in dietetics’ knowledge base and the concomitant changes in the profession’s relationship with food and social justice concerns. Her other research areas include non-diet approaches to understanding health and dietetic practice, the sociology of food and eating, and gendered aspects of food work. Jennifer will start as a new faculty member at Mount Saint Vincent University in Halifax, Nova Scotia in the fall.

Although my internship prepared me well to practice as a dietitian, I left it with more questions than answers.  I wondered about the (primarily) women who built the profession from the ground up. How and why had they created this profession?  How does their work continue to shape what the dietetic profession is today? continue reading

 

May
26
2016

Fasting during Ramadan: What dietitians need to know & how to help your clients

Mohamed, a dietitian from Egypt, shares tips for working with clients that participate in Ramadan and provides an example meal plan.  


MRHS1.jpgMohamed Rezk completed a B.Sc. in Biomedical Sciences from the University of Waterloo before completing his dietetics degree at Mount St. Vincent University. He currently works in his private practice, Re-Direct Nutrition Counselling, in Toronto. Mohamed grew up in Egypt and moved to Canada at the age of 20. This experience helped him realize the importance of learning about other cultures to help make his counselling more effective. You can reach Mohamed at mohamed@redirectnutrition.com. He also blogs on his website: www.redirectnutrition.com.


Ramadan is the one month per year where Muslims fast from dawn until sunset every day by refraining from food, water, smoking, medications, and even gum. Pregnant and breastfeeding women, children, seniors, and those on important medications or requiring nutrition care (such as people with diabetes, renal failure, or patients on tube feeds) are exempt from fasting.

During this month, Muslims spend more time getting closer to God, refrain from bad habits, and focus on spiritual growth. This year, Ramadan starts on June 7th. In Canada, Muslims will be fasting 16-17 hours per day, which allows for only 7-8 hours to nourish their bodies and sleep. While Muslim countries cut down their workdays by half during Ramadan, this is not the case in Canada. The combination of high expectations at work or school, long fasting hours, and poor nutrition could be a disaster for Muslims’ health. continue reading
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