Practice Blog

To share practice related stories, create connections and engage readers in the amazing diversity of dietitian experiences.


Mar
24
2016

Rethinking sodium: Reflections on research and implications for practice

A DC member from Cape Breton shares why she thinks we may need to change our thinking around sodium. 


STHS1.jpgSusan Taylor is the manager of clinical nutrition at the Cape Breton Regional Health Care Complex. Part of her role is direct patient care on the hospital telemetry unit. She is the main preceptor at her hospital for dietetic interns from three Atlantic Canada universities and enjoys the ongoing learning that being a preceptor entails. Susan decided to delve into the literature on sodium following an intern’s therapeutic update focused on this topic. Susan can be contacted at susan.taylor@nshealth.ca.

Over consumption of salt is a global health issue. Excessive sodium consumption is linked to a higher risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and stroke.1,2
 
Considering that Canadians consume an average of 3400mg of sodium/day,1 should we be concerned? United Kingdom and France also have high intakes, which vastly exceed the World Health Organization (WHO) recommended level of less than 2000mg daily.2
 
Median intakes of salt in the United States are similar to Canadian levels. It is postulated that these numbers may be even higher than the research shows as studies on salt consumption are generally based on self-reported data. People are likely to underestimate the true amount of food consumed.4 In Canada, the majority of sodium consumed (77%) comes from processed food.1,2 This may explain why people may not be aware of how much sodium they are actually consuming. continue reading
Feb
11
2016

You did not get a dietetic internship. Now what? [Part 2]

Five questions to ask yourself to improve your chance of getting offered an internship next year.


HanaHS1.JPGHana Klimczak is a Master of Health Studies candidate and a registered dietitian in Ontario. She has written articles for Canadian Family Magazine, been interviewed and quoted by the Huffington Post, Elevate Magazine, and Toronto Star, and has appeared on CTV news. Hana was not offered an internship on her first try and believes that her career benefited from it! You can reach her at nutritioncheck@live.ca, on Twitter at @nutrition_check, or visit her website at nutritioncheck.ca.   

Applying for a dietetic internship is a nerve-racking process. The competition is fierce and there aren’t enough spots for everyone. If you’re like most students, this time of year makes you nervous and anxious as you wait for the results of your internship applications. You can’t help but think: “What if I don’t get accepted?” I was no different. continue reading       
Feb
04
2016

You did not get a dietetic internship. Now what? [Part 1]

A dietitian who didn't get an internship on her first try shares what she learned from the experience. 


KWHS1.jpgKaty Wilson, BASc, RD completed her bachelor’s degree at Ryerson University and dietetic internship in northern Canada with a focus on Aboriginal populations. Since 2013, she has been working as a clinical dietitian within the Greater Toronto Area in a variety of inpatient and outpatient hospital settings. Katy loves her career and feels privileged to be able to help clients improve their health through food and nutrition. Contact Katy by email at katywilson_001@hotmail.com

February often brings back memories of that pit in my stomach knowing that my internship applications were being read by internship committees across the country. I was incredibly anxious as I waited for the mid-march notification. Then, my biggest fear came true: I did not get an internship. continue reading
 
Dec
11
2014

Reflections from BC’s longest standing licensing dietitian – a diminishing role worth fighting for!

Christine Chou, recently retired, began her career in public health in 1982 as a long-term care community nutritionist covering Delta, Surrey and White Rock in BC.  Although her job and catchment area changed through the years, she always maintained responsibility to the Community Care Facility Licensing program. Christine looks forward to aging with grace, and continuing to pursue her passions for food, books, travelling and learning, surrounded by family and friends. Look for her on warm sunny days atop of her spiffy new windsurfer and her “take no hills” not so new bicycle, or email her at cdchou@telus.net.

Healthcare facilities that provide care to three or more adults in British Columbia are required to be licensed and comply with the Community Care and Assisted Living Act and Regulations. This legislation, which includes a food and nutrition component sets the minimum standard for health and safety. Under the Community Care Facilities Licensing program, licensing officers are delegated the responsibility of inspecting and monitoring these facilities for compliance, and investigating complaints. In some health authorities, licensing officers are registered dietitians.
 
As the longest serving licensing dietitian in BC, if not Canada, I have much to reflect upon as I transition into retirement. continue reading

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