Practice Blog

To share practice related stories, create connections and engage readers in the amazing diversity of dietitian experiences.


Sep
08
2016

Use of thickened fluids in long term care: Is there a better alternative?

A dietitian working in long term care discusses achieving a balance between safety and quality of life for residents.


WHHS1.jpgWinnie Hung is a consulting dietitian, with a Master of Public Health, based in Vancouver. She has been a long term care dietitian since 2009. Winnie received the BC Regional Morgan Medal Award from the Canadian Foundation for Dietetic Research in 2010 for her work in acknowledging the gap between theory and practice in menu planning for residents in care. Receiving this award helped deepen her commitment to improving the quality of food for this vulnerable population. You can follow Winnie on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter or get in touch with her at  winnie.hung@healthquartet.com



“Winnie, Mr. B had excessive coughs when drinking his apple juice yesterday. Can you assess if he would benefit from thickened fluids?”
 
This is the type of message I receive on a regular basis from nurses and other care team members.  The demographics in long term care have changed in the past few years: people are being admitted at a later age with more complicated medical conditions, such as dysphagia.
 
When I was still a new dietitian in long term care, swallowing assessment referrals would lead to me going to see a resident with a tray of foods and liquids in various textures and consistencies by my side.  During the bedside swallowing assessment, I would observe the resident to see if any relevant symptoms were presented and recommend the appropriate textures to help minimize the risk of aspiration and/or pneumonia.  This is a standard scenario in a clinical setting, but I felt like something was missing. continue reading
 
Dec
11
2014

Reflections from BC’s longest standing licensing dietitian – a diminishing role worth fighting for!

Christine Chou, recently retired, began her career in public health in 1982 as a long-term care community nutritionist covering Delta, Surrey and White Rock in BC.  Although her job and catchment area changed through the years, she always maintained responsibility to the Community Care Facility Licensing program. Christine looks forward to aging with grace, and continuing to pursue her passions for food, books, travelling and learning, surrounded by family and friends. Look for her on warm sunny days atop of her spiffy new windsurfer and her “take no hills” not so new bicycle, or email her at cdchou@telus.net.

Healthcare facilities that provide care to three or more adults in British Columbia are required to be licensed and comply with the Community Care and Assisted Living Act and Regulations. This legislation, which includes a food and nutrition component sets the minimum standard for health and safety. Under the Community Care Facilities Licensing program, licensing officers are delegated the responsibility of inspecting and monitoring these facilities for compliance, and investigating complaints. In some health authorities, licensing officers are registered dietitians.
 
As the longest serving licensing dietitian in BC, if not Canada, I have much to reflect upon as I transition into retirement. continue reading

Want to subscribe?

To subscribe to the blog with your DC account, please log in here

Login

If you do not have an DC account, click Subscribe

Subscribe

Recent Posts

Tags

Tweet Tweet