Practice Blog

To share practice related stories, create connections and engage readers in the amazing diversity of dietitian experiences.


Dec
03
2015

Showcasing dietitians as the experts in nutrition: One initiative reaches thousands!

A group of dietitians worked hard to promote the dietetics profession to thousands of delegates at the 2015 canfitpro conference in Toronto.


HSJR1.jpgJodi Robinson is a consulting dietitian, certified diabetes educator, college professor, and fitness professional in the Niagara region. Her dream is to own a flourishing private practice. She recently took the leap and opened Craving Health – Dietitian & Wellness Services in Grimsby, Ontario. No matter how busy life gets, she finds time to hang out with her two adorable shelties and attend a few yoga classes each week. You can get in touch with her through her website, email Jodi@cravinghealth.ca, Twitter @Jodi_RD, and Facebook.

What do 12 dietitians, over 12,000 fitness professionals, and thousands of others have in common? We all attended the annual canfitpro International Fitness Conference and Trade Show in Toronto this past August. For those not familiar with canfitpro, it’s the largest body of fitness professionals in Canada and every year they host conferences across the country as an opportunity for fitness professionals to obtain continuing education credits and for the public to attend health and wellness presentations.

It’s hard to believe that I have been attending the canfitpro Toronto conference since 1998 while still in high school. At first, I attended as a volunteer and then as a fitness professional. Every conference offers a multitude of nutrition workshops; however, to my surprise, very few of these are facilitated by dietitians. Rather, holistic nutritionists, fitness experts, and chiropractors—to name just a few—take centre stage voicing their authority on nutrition. Many of these groups also host a booth at the trade show engaging people with their services and products that—to the cringe of many dietitians—may not be evidence-based. continue reading
 
Sep
03
2014

A dietitian takes action: Responding to misleading nutrition information via a letter to the editor

Tanis-Headshot.jpgDr. Tanis Fenton – Registered Dietitian and Epidemiologist – is best known for her work as Evidence Analyst for DC’s Practice-based Evidence in Nutrition, Nutrition Research Lead for Alberta Health Services and Adjunct Assistant Professor at the University of Calgary’s Faculty of Medicine. Dr. Fenton has published several peer-reviewed manuscripts, which have advanced dietitians’ collective understandings in challenging practice areas. Dr. Fenton was recently named a 2014 DC Fellow – congratulations Tanis!

Reading a health column in Reader’s Digest (Canada), a popular health and lifestyle magazine sold in grocery stores, I saw recommendations for cleansing. They suggested reducing food intake to a minimum and relying on juices only for up to 8 days, to gain the benefits of reduced “exposure to toxins and allow certain organs, such as the liver, to rejuvenate” (April 2013). There were 3 authors to the article, a yoga instructor whom provided quite reasonable advice, a medical doctor, and a Nutritionist, the latter two whose responses were concerning. continue reading

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