Practice Blog

To share practice related stories, create connections and engage readers in the amazing diversity of dietitian experiences.


Reflections on my PMDip Program Experience

RC-HS1.jpgCarmen El-Khazen received an Honours BSc (2013) from the University of Toronto in Nutritional Sciences and Human Biology, and a BASc with Honours (2016) in Nutrition and Food from Ryerson University. She is a recent graduate of the Professional Masters Diploma in Dietetics (PMDip) - St. Michael's Hospital/Ryerson University Collaborative Dietetic Program. Alongside her prime passion for clinical nutrition and dietetics, Carmen also enjoys cooking, dance-fitness, playing piano, and music! Connect with Carmen on LinkedIn.

With the variety of dietetic internship options available, choosing a program can be confusing. By sharing my personal experience in the “PMDip” program, I hope to provide some insight to nutrition students journeying along the same dietetics path. .    continue reading

Building our Future: One Cooking Camp at a Time

How one dietitian supports dietetics skill development through cooking camps

RC-HS1.jpgCristel Moubarak Hackenbruch is a registered dietitian known to be a Jill-of- all-trades in her profession. She embraces opportunities that cover nutrition, food, education and people! Cristel is the founder and director of nutriFoodie – an organization focused on nutrition education, food-literacy and cooking skills. Cristel loves to share her knowledge, educating people about nutrition and how to get the most out of what they put on their plate. Cristel is an active volunteer with Dietitians of Canada, and is currently the BC lead for the Dietitian Brand Initiative. Outside of nutriFoodie, Cristel is a manager in a foodservice establishment where she manages a team of 25 staff in daily operations, developing and testing recipes and menus in addition to planning, executing and spearheading large events. Connect with Cristel at and on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Think back to the time you were a prospective dietetics student. I can bet that one memory we all have in common is that of the stress that came with trying to get into a very competitive integrated dietetics or internship program.    continue reading

Critical Creative Thinking: the Difference Between Surviving and Thriving for Dietetics

A theoretical and practical look at how critical creative thinking can enhance dietetic practice. 

Gurneet-Dhami.jpg Gurneet Dhami is a nutrition graduate from Ryerson University's BASc and is in pursuit of her MSc AHN at Mount Saint Vincent University in Fall 2017. She enjoys taking part in a wide range of professional development activities and traveling around Toronto for the next big thing. Gurneet's interest revolves around the social determinants of health, and how it impacts individual livelihoods. In tune with Canada's 150th, she hopes to critically explore dietetic diversity in her thesis and professional work. Connect with Gurneet on LinkedIn or email at .
Jennifer-Brady.jpgJennifer Brady is an Assistant Professor in Applied Human Nutrition at Mount Saint Vincent University. Her work draws on feminist and critical social theory to explore the history of the dietetic profession in Canada and the role of dietitians in social justice advocacy. She is working on publishing her recently completed dissertation, Trading the Apron for the White Lab Coat: A Contemporary History of Dietetics in Canada, 1954 to 2016.

It is likely that most of us appreciate the importance of critical thinking to our practice, but have you thought about how critical thinking applies to your practice or about the importance of creativity? Researchers who study critical thinking have increasingly recognized the important relationship between critical and creative thinking, and have developed the term “critical creative thinking” to acknowledge their mutual importance and interdependence. According to researchers, critical creative thinking includes skill-based know how, but also an open-mind and a willingness to think in ways that may not be familiar or to risk being unsettled by the process. Critical creative thinking has also been connected to the growing need for health care practitioners, including dietitians, to engage as change makers in many of the social and political issues that impact food, nutrition, and health. continue reading

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