Practice Blog

To share practice related stories, create connections and engage readers in the amazing diversity of dietitian experiences.


Aug
04
2016

Dietitians: Social justice trailblazers then and now

Think having roots in home economics is boring? Think again.  


JenB-HS1.jpegJennifer Brady is a dietitian and a PhD candidate in the School of Kinesiology and Health Studies at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario. Her dissertation explores the history of the dietetic profession in Canada, specifically the changes in dietetics’ knowledge base and the concomitant changes in the profession’s relationship with food and social justice concerns. Her other research areas include non-diet approaches to understanding health and dietetic practice, the sociology of food and eating, and gendered aspects of food work. Jennifer will start as a new faculty member at Mount Saint Vincent University in Halifax, Nova Scotia in the fall.

Although my internship prepared me well to practice as a dietitian, I left it with more questions than answers.  I wondered about the (primarily) women who built the profession from the ground up. How and why had they created this profession?  How does their work continue to shape what the dietetic profession is today? continue reading

 

Mar
03
2016

YouTube: A great nutrition communication tool that most dietitians know nothing about

Abbey Sharp, who has had over 50,000 views on a single YouTube video, shares insider tips that may inspire you to join her online.


ASHS100.jpgAbbey Sharp is a registered dietitian, an avid food writer and blogger, a TV and radio personality, a food brand spokesperson, a recipe developer, a food event hostess, and the founder of Abbey's Kitchen Inc. Abbey believes that a pleasurable relationship with food is inherently essential for good health and shares this unique philosophy through her regular contributions to The Marilyn Denis Show (CTV), Best Health Magazine, and her hit YouTube series, Abbey’s Kitchen. Check out her blog, subscribe to her YouTube channel, or follow her on social media (Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram).
 
A lot of people ask me what I do for a living, and I never really know what answer to give them. I usually begin by describing myself as a “media registered dietitian,” but if I go into a further description it is often pretty lengthy. I’m a blogger, spokesperson, recipe developer, freelance food and nutrition writer, TV expert, and now, I’m a relatively successful (yet still pretty new) YouTuber.
 
Moving to digital video communications seemed like a natural progression for me after I had reached a level of stability and readership with my blog, Abbey’s Kitchen. I had done a short 12-webisode series three years ago upon launching myself full time into blogging, but had shied away from it after that because of the financial commitment.
 
Shooting 12 short videos meant hiring a film crew, editor, and a makeup and hair stylist. After that, I needed to buy music, groceries, props, and rent film equipment. I easily sunk over $10,000 into the whole thing and got somewhere around 500 minutes of video. continue reading
Mar
12
2015

Accidentally inventing a food product – you could do it too!

PCHS1.jpgPatricia Chuey is a BC-based dietitian and food communications expert known as The People’s Dietitian. In 2014, she was awarded Fellowship in Dietitians of Canada and an Alumni of Influence award from the University of Saskatchewan for her work in encouraging Canadians to live healthy. A diagnosis of celiac disease, followed by a frustrating quest to find a tasty, nutritious gluten free flour, suitable for baking, led to Patricia becoming a food developer. She can be reached through patriciachuey.com or on Facebook/Twitter @PatriciaChuey.

One of the best things about being in a line of work that impacts 100% of people on the planet, with the subject matter being food, is that the opportunities to support consumers in their quest for well-being seem endless. I often describe a dietitian’s career path as being like a beautiful fruit tree with a solid root base of science and food education that goes on to branch out in many directions as it grows. As an entrepreneurial dietitian, watching my branches grow has felt far more like play than work. continue reading
Dec
04
2014

Why can’t hospitals sell junk food? Capital Health’s journey to healthy eating – Part 2

Jane Pryor is a graduate of the nutrition program at Mount Saint Vincent University in Halifax and completed her dietetic internship at Vancouver General Hospital. Jane started her career in clinical nutrition but quickly switched to administrative dietetics where she found her passion in managing various programs and services through the years. Jane can be reached at (902)473-2205 or by email.

Part one of this blog post was written in August 2014, after the publication of the Medical Post story entitled, “Why hospitals can survive, and thrive, without fast food.” What I want to tell you about now is some of the success stories that we have had in our retail services, and to provide you with some insight for your sites journey to healthy eating. continue reading

Sep
03
2014

A dietitian takes action: Responding to misleading nutrition information via a letter to the editor

Tanis-Headshot.jpgDr. Tanis Fenton – Registered Dietitian and Epidemiologist – is best known for her work as Evidence Analyst for DC’s Practice-based Evidence in Nutrition, Nutrition Research Lead for Alberta Health Services and Adjunct Assistant Professor at the University of Calgary’s Faculty of Medicine. Dr. Fenton has published several peer-reviewed manuscripts, which have advanced dietitians’ collective understandings in challenging practice areas. Dr. Fenton was recently named a 2014 DC Fellow – congratulations Tanis!

Reading a health column in Reader’s Digest (Canada), a popular health and lifestyle magazine sold in grocery stores, I saw recommendations for cleansing. They suggested reducing food intake to a minimum and relying on juices only for up to 8 days, to gain the benefits of reduced “exposure to toxins and allow certain organs, such as the liver, to rejuvenate” (April 2013). There were 3 authors to the article, a yoga instructor whom provided quite reasonable advice, a medical doctor, and a Nutritionist, the latter two whose responses were concerning. continue reading

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