Food Sources of Riboflavin (Vitamin B2)

Posted: Oct 28, 2016

Information about Riboflavin

 
  • Riboflavin is a water-soluble B vitamin (vitamin B2). This means that riboflavin is not stored in the body. You need to eat foods rich in riboflavin every day.
  • Riboflavin helps your body cells use fat, protein and carbohydrates from foods to produce energy.
  • Riboflavin helps in the production of niacin (vitamin B3) and pyridoxine (vitamin B6).

How Much Riboflavin Should I Aim For?

 
Age in Years Aim for an intake of
milligrams (mg)/day
Stay below mg/day
Women 19 and older 1.1 No upper limit established for this nutrient.
Men 19 and older 1.3
Pregnant Women
19 and older
1.4
Breastfeeding Women
19 and older
1.6
 

Riboflavin Content of Some Common Foods

 
This following table will show you sources of riboflavin. Milk and dairy products are the richest sources.

Food Serving Size Riboflavin (mg)
Vegetables and Fruits
Vegetables
Mushroom (white, portabello, crimini), raw or cooked 125 mL (½ cup) 0.2-0.6
 
Spinach, cooked 125 mL (½ cup) 0.2
Grain Products
Cereal, corn flakes 30 g (check product label for serving size) 1.1
Cereal, muesli 30 g (check product label for serving size) 0.2
Waffle 1 small (35g)           0.2
Milk and Alternatives
Milk (3.3% homo, 2%, 1%, skim) 250 mL (1 cup) 0.4-0.5
Cottage cheese 250 mL (1 cup) 0.4-0.6
Buttermilk 250 mL (1 cup) 0.4
Cheese, feta      50 g (1½ oz) 0.4
Yogurt beverage             200 mL 0.4
Yogurt (fruit, plain, Greek), all types      175 g (¾ cup) 0.2-0.4
Soy beverage 250 mL (1 cup) 0.4
Cheese (cheddar, monterey, edam, colby, blue, brie, camembert) 50 g (1½ oz) 0.2
Ricotta cheese 125 mL (½ cup) 0.2
Meat and Alternatives    
Meat    
Pork, various cuts, cooked 75 g (2½ oz) 0.2-0.3
Beef, various cuts, cooked 75 g (2½ oz) 0.2-0.3
Chicken or turkey, dark meat, cooked 75 g (2½ oz) 0.2
Organ Meats    
Liver (chicken, turkey, pork, beef), cooked 75 g (2½ oz) 1.6-2.7
Fish and Seafood    
Cuttlefish, cooked         75 g (2½ oz) 1.3
Salmon, cooked 75 g (2½ oz) 0.4
Mackerel, cooked 75 g (2½ oz) 0.3-0.4
Squid, cooked 75 g (2½ oz) 0.3
Trout, cooked 75 g (2½ oz) 0.3
Shellfish (clams, mussels), cooked 75 g (2½ oz) 0.2-0.3
Herring, cooked 75 g (2½ oz) 0.2
Sardines, canned in oil 75 g (2½ oz) 0.2
Meat Alternatives    
Vegetarian meatloaf or patty, cooked 75 g (2½ oz) 0.5
Tempeh/fermented soy product, cooked 150 g (3/4 cup) 0.5
Egg, cooked 2 large 0.4-0.5
Almonds, without shell 60 mL (¼ cup) 0.3-0.4
Soy nuts 60 mL (1/4 cup) 0.2
Meatless, chicken, cooked 75 g (2½ oz) 0.2
Other    
Yeast extract spread (marmite or vegemite) 30 mL (2 Tbsp) 5.3
 

Source: "Canadian Nutrient File 2015" .
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/nutrition/fiche-nutri-data/index-eng.php    
 [Accessed June 2016]. 


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