Food Sources of Thiamin (Vitamin B1)

Posted: Nov 7, 2016

Information About Thiamin

 
  • Thiamin is one of the B vitamins. 
  • Thiamin’s main role is to help your body use carbohydrates and protein to make energy.
 

How Much Thiamin Should I Aim For?

 
Age in Years Aim for an intake of
milligrams (mg)/day
Stay below
mg/day
Men 19 and older 1.2  
A safe upper limit has not been determined.
Women 19 and older 1.1
Pregnant Women 19 and older 1.4
Breastfeeding Women 19 and older 1.4
 

Thiamin Content of Some Common Foods

 
The best sources of thiamin include yeast extract, pork, fortified breakfast cereals, enriched grain products and meatless soy products.  This table will show you foods which are sources of thiamin.
 
Food Serving size Thiamin (mg)
Vegetables and Fruit
Vegetables
Soybean sprouts, cooked 125 mL (1/2 cup) 0.28
Edamame/baby soybeans, cooked 125 mL (1/2 cup) 0.25
Green peas,  cooked 125 mL (1/2 cup) 0.22 - 0.24
Lima beans, cooked 125 mL (1/2 cup) 0.22
Squash, acorn, cooked 125 mL (1/2 cup) 0.18
Potato, with skin, cooked 1 medium 0.10-0.15
Grain Products    
Grains
Wheat germ, raw 30 g (¼ cup) 0.50
Corn flour 20 g (2 Tbsp) 0.29
Pasta, white, enriched, cooked 125 mL (1/2 cup) 0.21- 0.29
Pasta, egg noodles, enriched, cooked 125 mL (1/2 cup) 0.16 - 0.21
Cereals
Oatmeal, instant, cooked 175 mL (¾ cup) 0.72
Cereal, dry, all types 30 g (check product label for serving size) 0.60
Hot oat bran cereal, cooked 175 mL (¾ cup) 0.40
Muesli and granola 30 g (check product label for serving size) 0.22
Oatmeal (1 minute), cooked 175 mL (¾ cup) 0.21
Other Grain Products
Breakfast bar, corn flake crust with fruit 1 bar (37 g) 0.37
Bagel, plain ½ bagel 0.30
Breakfast bar, oatmeal 1 bar (47 g) 0.24
Granola bar, oat, fruits and nut 1 bar (43 g) 0.21
Waffle, frozen, cooked 1 waffle 0.19
Bread (white, whole wheat, rye, mixed grain) 1 slice (35 g) 0.08 – 0.17
Milk and Alternatives
Soy beverage, 250 mL (1 cup) 0.10
Meat and Alternatives
Meat
Pork, various cuts, cooked 75 g (2 ½ oz) 0.43- 1.05
Pork, ground, cooked 75 g (2 ½ oz) 0.75-0.77
Pork, ham, cooked 75 g (2 ½ oz) 0.41
Venison/deer, various cuts, cooked 75 g (2 ½ oz) 0.19 – 0.38
Liver (chicken, pork), cooked 75 g (2 ½ oz) 0.13-0.22
Fish and Seafood    
Tuna,yellowfin/albacore, cooked 75 g (2 ½ oz) 0.10
Trout, cooked 75 g (2 ½ oz) 0.11-0.32
Salmon, Atlantic, cooked 75 g (2 ½ oz) 0.11 - 0.26
Pickerel/walleye, cooked 75 g (2 ½ oz) 0.23
Mussels, cooked 75 g (2 ½ oz) 0.23
Tuna, bluefin, cooked 75 g (2 ½ oz) 0.21
           
 
Meat Alternatives    
Meatless, luncheon slices 75 g (2 ½ oz) 3.00
Soy burger, vegetarian meatloaf or patty, cooked 75 g (2 ½ oz) 2.00
Meatless (chicken, fish sticks, meatballs), cooked 75 g (2 ½ oz) 0.70-0.96
Legumes (dried beans, peas and lentils)    
Beans (soybeans, black, pinto, adzuki, kidney, lima, navy, roman), cooked 175 mL (¾ cup) 0.22 - 0.35
Lentils, cooked 175 mL (¾ cup) 0.25-0.28
Baked beans, canned 175 mL (¾ cup) 0.18
Nuts and Seeds    
Sunflower seeds, without shell 60 mL (¼ cup) 0.54
Chinese/Japanese chestnuts,  without shell 60 mL (¼ cup) 0.16 - 0.32
Nuts (pistachio, macadamia, brazil nuts, hazelnuts, pecans, peanuts), without shell 60 mL (¼ cup) 0.17 - 0.24
Tahini/sesame seed butter 15mL (1 Tbsp) 0.19
Soy nuts 60 mL (¼ cup) 0.12
Others    
Yeast extract spread (marmite/vegemite) 15mL (1 Tbsp) 4.29
 

Source: "Canadian Nutrient File 2015"
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/nutrition/fiche-nutri-data/index-eng.php
 [accessed August 24, 2016]

 


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